Archive for 05/30/2012

Jamaica Information Service – 

The Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT) has commenced work towards securing Port Royal’s inclusion on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s (UNESCO) list of World Heritage sites.

The process involves a series of activities, focusing mainly on the portions of the Sunken City, and adjoining areas over which the town’s existing layout was built, culminating with the preparation and submission of the nomination dossier to UNESCO in July 2014.

Port Royal is currently on UNESCO’s World Heritage tentative list, having been so placed in February 2009.

One of the activities, an assessment of the sites, was conducted over the last week by a team, headed by Professor of the Nautical Archaeology programme, Anthropology Department, Texas A&M University, in the United States, Dr. Donny Hamilton.

Speaking at the presentation of the findings, at the Morgan’s Harbour Hotel, Port Royal, on May 29, the JNHT’s Technical Director in charge of Archaeology, Dorrick Gray, said the week-long exercise entailed visiting and viewing the sunken structures beneath the sea, within the harbour, and under the town’s existing buildings and general layout, totalling upwards of 51 acres, the state of which is well preserved.

Full story…

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Janis Blower – 

A unique collection of documents and other records, much of it relating to shipbuilding and marine engineering in the North East, is being made available to the public on Tyneside.

The School of Marine Science’s Special Collection at Newcastle University dates back, in some cases, to the 19th century, and covers industries such as marine engine building, shiprepairing, and shipbreaking among others.

The collection includes company records, brochures and catalogues, ship and yard plans and photographs.

Wonderfully, there is also a British shipbuilding database, listing some 80,000 British-built ships of the 19th and 20th centuries, searchable by name etc, though this is only available in-house and not on the Internet.

Funding of the collection has been made possible by a number of organisations, among them the Catherine Cookson Foundation and the Sir James Knott Trust.

It includes company records of Swan Hunter, going back to 1890; British Shipbuilders and its subsidiaries; shipbreaking companies, such as Hughes Bolckow of Blyth, and North Eastern Marine at Wallsend.

Full story…